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sonateharder:

"As winner of all five top prizes at the 15th International Frédéric Chopin Competition in Warsaw in 2005, Blechacz’s career was firmly launched. But it was his recent win, in 2014, of the prestigious Gilmore Artist Award – with its $300,000.00 prize – that added even greater lustre to his stature as a major international artist.

Based solely upon what was heard on Sunday, however, one wonders what the fuss is all about. The handsome, boyish, 29 year-old Polish pianist is short, of slight build and sports a mop of hair reminiscent of an Anton Rubenstein. He holds himself erect at the keyboard when he plays and looks every inch the youthful, romantic pianist.

But the afternoon was what one might call a ‘tidy’ performance. Nothing was out-of-place. But neither was it transfiguring. There were things to admire, to be sure. An assured technique, a sensitivity of touch, but interpretively, little was out of the ordinary. In fact one can think of countless pianists who could have handled this programme with greater insight and decidedly more personality.

A few moments stand out in one’s memory: an exquisite slow movement in Bach’s Concerto, the arresting opening section of Beethoven’s Sonata (another Beethovenian portrait of Orpheus soothing the wild beasts as in the slow movement of his Fourth Piano Concerto). As for the Chopin – works which are central to Blechacz’s repertoire – they varied from a meandering E Major Nocturne to a largely satisfying F-Sharp Minor Polonaise.

Oddly enough, it was his single encore – the playful scherzo from Beethoven’s Piano Sonata Opus 2, No. 2 – that made the greatest impression. Played with Mendelssohnian sprightliness and wit, Blechacz charmed one to the core.

But while the case of the Gilmore Artist Award may be closed, based upon the evidence presented on Sunday, the jury is still out.”

Neil Crory is bang on in his review of Sunday’s concert by Rafal Blechacz at Toronto’s Koerner Hall — the slow movement of the Bach was ecstatic, but the rest of the first half left me cold.
(via Musical Toronto)

Hertzapoppin - Pianoforte A.W.Brauer Berlin

Hertzapoppin – Pianoforte A.W.Brauer Berlin

Domanda :

Gent.mo Sig. Francesco,
mi è stato proposto l’acquisto di un pianoforte verticale A. W. BRAUER BERLIN probabilmente datato 1920 / 1930 al prezzo di € 300,00.
Non essendo riuscito a trovare notizie su tale marca, le chiedo per cortesia se è in grado di darmi indicazioni in merito.
Cordialmente,
Giuseppe.

 

 

Risposta :

Gentile Giuseppe,

Purtroppo non sono riuscito a ricavare nessuna…

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sonateharder:

instrumental-artistry:

Grand piano, ca. 1840
Érard & Co. (case by George H. Blake), London

- Materials: woods (case is satinwood), metals, various
- Keys: 80
- Other Notes: This piano features Érard’s patented double-escapement action - the most advanced at the time and what is still used in modern grand pianos. The richly marquetried Louis XV–style case was commissioned by Lord Foley II, baron of Kidder.

Source: NY-MetMA

GOLDDDDDDD!!!!!!!

sonateharder:

instrumental-artistry:

Grand piano, ca. 1840
Érard & Co. (case by George H. Blake), London

- Materials: woods (case is satinwood), metals, various
- Keys: 80
- Other Notes: This piano features Érard’s patented double-escapement action - the most advanced at the time and what is still used in modern grand pianos. The richly marquetried Louis XV–style case was commissioned by Lord Foley II, baron of Kidder.

Source: NY-MetMA

GOLDDDDDDD!!!!!!!

Hertzapoppin – Pianoforte Hofmann

Domanda : Salve, ho ricevuto in regalo un pianoforte verticale Hofmann. Numero di serie IV 27966. All’interno la meccanica è kohler e sulla ghisa c’è un logo circolare con al centro una cetra stilizzata (credo) e sulla circonferenza la scritta Gr.

sonateharder:

instrumental-artistry:

Grand piano, ca. 1840
Érard & Co. (case by George H. Blake), London

- Materials: woods (case is satinwood), metals, various
- Keys: 80
- Other Notes: This piano features Érard’s patented double-escapement action - the most advanced at the time and what is still used in modern grand pianos. The richly marquetried Louis XV–style case was commissioned by Lord Foley II, baron of Kidder.

Source: NY-MetMA

GOLDDDDDDD!!!!!!!

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